Facebook Shows 20 Gbps Millimeter Wireless Broadband Speed

Recently in an announcement from Facebook researchers and engineers from Facebook’s Connectivity Lab has finally managed to get over 20 Gbps over millimeter-wave (MMW) technology at a distance of more than eight miles (over 13 km) when they were testing millimeter wireless broadband technology.

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Facebook’s researchers have worked hard for weeks and finally last week it was announced. This effort was made by facebook to expand the reach of the broadband services to those less connected parts of the world.

Facebook Shows 20 Gbps Millimeter Wireless Broadband

Facebook Shows 20 Gbps Millimeter Wireless Broadband

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Tiwari wrote in a Facebook Engineering Blog entry posted Thursday, “To put this in perspective, our demonstrated capacity is enough data to stream almost 1,000 ultra-high-definition videos at the same time.”

Te RF team has finally got succeed f20 Gbps mark over 2 GHz of bandwidth using “custom-built components” it is said that these components consume 105 watts of total direct current (DC) power at the transmitter and receiver, according to Abhishek Tiwari of Facebook Connectivity Labs.

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In Southern California, the tests were carried out using the E-band, a group of millimeter wave frequencies between 60 and 90GHz. And Facebook is planning to use MMW links for connecting a fleet of solar-powered drones that are designed to provide broadband coverage over a “60-mile-wide area on the ground,” at data rates more than 30 Gbps.

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The company talks about the advancements stating, “The next generation air-to-ground communication system capable of supporting 40 Gbps each on uplink and downlink between an aircraft and a ground station will be flight-tested in early 2017, “We will continue to push the limits of wireless capacity over long ranges while staying within the tough size, weight and power constraints of Aquila communication payloads.”

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